very interesting in current affairs, science news ,collection of coins, watching socio fabric nature

11th July 2014

Audio post

Prime Minister Narendra Modi accepts Barack Obama’s invitation to visit Washington in September.

Lok Sabha passes AP Re-organisation (Amendment) Bill.

236 revenue villages of Khammam District merged with Andhra to facilitate Polavaram project; Telangana Chief Minister terms centre’s stance as undemocratic.

Mizoram Governor Vakkom Purushothaman, transferred to Nagaland, resigns.

Industrial production grows by 4.7 percent in May, recording fastest growth in 19 months.

Stock market weakens further; Sensex down 348 points.

In cricket,pacers put India in driver’s seat in the first innings in Nottingham Test against England.

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Source: SoundCloud / allindiaradionews

9th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The New York Botanical Garden with 876 notes

nybg:

The hottest time of year is made a bit cooler by the lotus and water lily blossoms in our reflecting pools. Here are some gorgeous shots of Nelumbo nucifera (or sacred lotus) and Nymphaea ‘Clyde Ikins’, a water lily—before you check the captions, can you tell which is which? ~LM

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9th July 2014

Photo reblogged from UC San Diego Health Sciences News with 217 notes

ucsdhealthsciences:

“Den” of leaves
Dendritic cells get their name from their surface projections, which somewhat resemble the dendrites of neurons, the branchlike extensions that increase the surface of a cell body and receive information from other neurons.
Dendritic cells are found in most tissues of the body, most abundantly in those that interface between internal and external environments, such as the skin, lungs and lining of the gastrointestinal tract. Here, they’re suitably placed to serve their primary function, which is to continuously sample their surroundings for antigens, such as dead cells or invasive microbes. They are a key player in the body’s immune response system.
Once exposed to an antigen, say a virus, the sheets of the dendritic cell entrap it so that it can be degraded by internal lysosomes into peptide fragments and then redisplayed to circulating T cells, which develop the appropriate immune response. 
The image above is an artistic rendering, based on ion abrasion scanning electron microscopy developed at the National Institutes of Health.

ucsdhealthsciences:

“Den” of leaves

Dendritic cells get their name from their surface projections, which somewhat resemble the dendrites of neurons, the branchlike extensions that increase the surface of a cell body and receive information from other neurons.

Dendritic cells are found in most tissues of the body, most abundantly in those that interface between internal and external environments, such as the skin, lungs and lining of the gastrointestinal tract. Here, they’re suitably placed to serve their primary function, which is to continuously sample their surroundings for antigens, such as dead cells or invasive microbes. They are a key player in the body’s immune response system.

Once exposed to an antigen, say a virus, the sheets of the dendritic cell entrap it so that it can be degraded by internal lysosomes into peptide fragments and then redisplayed to circulating T cells, which develop the appropriate immune response

The image above is an artistic rendering, based on ion abrasion scanning electron microscopy developed at the National Institutes of Health.

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9th July 2014

Link reblogged from Stanford Graduate School of Business with 105 notes

10 Tips To Make You More Powerful at Work →

stanfordbusiness:

image


Whether you’re giving a presentation, entering a negotiation, or simply trying to influence a coworker, being aware of power structures and your own power is key for success. Check out our research round-up on how to build, maintain, and demonstrate power at work:

WORKING WITH POWER

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5th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Fast Company with 334 notes

fastcompany:

247 Years Of American Flags, Visualized
During more than 200 years of American history, the United States flag has undergone near-constant transformation. The prolific infographic designers at Pop Chart Lab condensed 247 years of the American flag’s design evolution into one poster—from the Sons of Liberty’s rebellious stripes in 1767 to the pattern we know today.
Read More>

fastcompany:

247 Years Of American Flags, Visualized

During more than 200 years of American history, the United States flag has undergone near-constant transformation. The prolific infographic designers at Pop Chart Lab condensed 247 years of the American flag’s design evolution into one poster—from the Sons of Liberty’s rebellious stripes in 1767 to the pattern we know today.

Read More>

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4th July 2014

Video reblogged from Newsweek with 36 notes

newsweek:

These poor trees.

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4th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Scientific Illustration with 646 notes

wapiti3:

Foliage key to trees and shrubs including those native and introduced species with alternate leaves that are deciduous and simi-evergreen and hardy in New England and New York. ;By Thurston, Arthur S. on Flickr.

Publication info 1916.
Contributing Library:
UMass Amherst Libraries
BioDiv. Library

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Source: wapiti3

4th July 2014

Photo reblogged from AFP Photo with 48 notes

afp-photo:

INDIA, Allahabad : Indian Muslim devotees break their Ramadan fast outside the Shah Baba Mosque at Allahabad Junction railway station in Allahabad on July 3, 2014. Like millions of Muslim around the world, Indian Muslims celebrate the month of Ramadan by abstaining from eating, drinking, and smoking as well as sexual activities from dawn to dusk. AFP PHOTO / SANJAY KANOJIA

afp-photo:

INDIA, Allahabad : Indian Muslim devotees break their Ramadan fast outside the Shah Baba Mosque at Allahabad Junction railway station in Allahabad on July 3, 2014. Like millions of Muslim around the world, Indian Muslims celebrate the month of Ramadan by abstaining from eating, drinking, and smoking as well as sexual activities from dawn to dusk. AFP PHOTO / SANJAY KANOJIA

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4th July 2014

Audio post reblogged from University of California Research with 68 notes

ucresearch:

Slow food culture in a fast food world  


Chef Alice Waters believes that food can be a catalyst for deeper transformations in education and culture. At her UCLA talk, she argues that the grave issues we face — poverty, fair wages for workers, violence and climate change — are all by-products of something much deeper: a culture of fast food values.

In the United States, there’s a complete mixing up of the idea of “affordability” and “cheapness.” There’s a deep feeling that value is equated with bargains. No one understands the real prices of things anymore because: 1. no one tells them and 2. everything is supported artificially with subsidies and corporate sleight of hand and credit.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been accused of being a Farmers market philanthropist because I believe in paying people for the true cost of their food and their products. And people say that I’m artificially driving up the prices of food in the markets. And I say, it’s the discounted prices that are artificial. I feel that it’s my responsibility to pay for the true cost of things, if I can.

The truth is — and I think we all need to learn this —things can be affordable, but they can never be cheap.When I hear somebody say, “I just got something cheaper here,” I feel intuitively that somebody, somewhere is being sold out.

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22nd June 2014

Photo reblogged from UNICEF with 127 notes

unicef:

This is a tremendous achievement, and a sign of the huge steps the world has made in providing more children with access to health services.Every child has the right to health. Learn more about children’s rights at: http://uni.cf/crc

unicef:

This is a tremendous achievement, and a sign of the huge steps the world has made in providing more children with access to health services.

Every child has the right to health. Learn more about children’s rights at: http://uni.cf/crc

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